2018-2019 Event choices

Congratulations!  You are now an official Science Olympiad team member.

An all-team meeting has been scheduled for Wednesday, November 14th at 3:00pm in Miss Williams’ room.  It is important that everyone attend.  This meeting will last at least one hour.  We will be making out the practice schedules so EVERYONE needs to bring a copy of all of their calendars and athletic practice schedules to this meeting.  If you are unable to attend this important practice, let Miss Williams, Mr. Clapsaddle, Mr. Gilbert, or Mrs. Gangwer know.

TURN IN YOUR EVENT CHOICE SHEET/INFORMATION SHEET by 3 pm Thursday, Nov 8th!!!!!

 

2018-2019 Division B (grades 6-9) Events

 

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY:  Understand the anatomy of the human body systems: cardiovascular, lymphatic

and excretory.

BATTERY BUGGY:  Teams will construct a vehicle that uses electrical energy as its sole means of propulsion, quickly

travels a specified distance, and stops as close as possible to the Target Point.

BOOMILEVER: Teams will design and build a Boomilever meeting requirements specified in the rules supporting a

minimum load and to achieve the highest structural efficiency.

CIRCUIT LAB: Participants must complete tasks and answer questions about electricity and magnetism.

CRIME BUSTERS:  Given a scenario, a collection of evidence, and possible suspects, students will perform a series of

tests that along with other evidence will be used to solve a crime.

DENSITY LAB: Participants compete in activities and answer questions about mass, density, number density, area

density, concentration, pressure and buoyancy.

DISEASE DETECTIVES:  Participants will use investigative skills in the scientific study of disease, injury, health and

disability in populations or groups of people.

DYNAMIC PLANET: Students will use process skills to complete tasks related to glaciers, glaciation and long-term

climate change.

ELASTIC LAUNCHED GLIDER:  Prior to the tournament teams design, construct, and test elastic launched gliders to

achieve the maximum time aloft.

EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN:  This event will determine a participant's ability to design, conduct and report the findings

of an experiment conducted entirely on site.

FOSSILS: Teams demonstrate their knowledge of ancient life by completing selected tasks at a series of stations

including but not limited to fossil identification, answering questions about classification, habitat, ecologic

relationships, behaviors, environmental adaptations and the use of fossils to date and correlate rock units.

GAME ON:  This event will determine a team's ability to design and build an original computer game using the

program Scratch incorporating the scientific theme provided to them by the supervisor.

HEREDITY:  Participants will solve problems and analyze data or diagrams using their knowledge of the basic

principles of genetics.

HERPETOLOGY:  Participants will be assessed on their knowledge of amphibians and reptiles.

METEOROLOGY:  This event emphasizes understanding of basic meteorological principles with emphasis on

analysis and interpretation of meteorological data, graphs, charts and images.

MYSTERY ARCHITECTURE:  At the beginning of the event, teams will be given a bag of building materials and

instructions for designing and building a device that can be tested.

POTIONS AND POISONS:  This event is about chemical properties and effects of specified toxic and therapeutic

chemical substances, with a focus on household and environmental toxins or poisons.

ROAD SCHOLAR:  Participants will answer interpretive questions that may use one or more state highway maps,

USGS topographic maps, Internet-generated maps, a road atlas or satellite/aerial images.

ROLLER COASTER:  Prior to the competition, teams design, build, and test a roller coaster track to guide a ball or

sphere that uses gravitational potential energy as its sole means of propulsion to travel as close as possible

to a target time.

SOLAR SYSTEM:  Students will demonstrate an understanding and knowledge of the geologic characteristics and

evolution of the Earth's moon and other rocky bodies of the solar system.

THERMODYNAMICS:  Teams must construct an insulated device prior to the tournament that is designed to retain

heat and complete a written test on thermodynamic concepts.

WATER QUALITY:  Participants will be assessed on their understanding and evaluation of aquatic environments.

WRITE IT DO IT:  One student will write a description of an object and how to build it, and then the other student

will attempt to construct the object from this description.

 

 

2018-2019 Division C (grades 9-12) Events

 

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY:  Understand the anatomy and physiology of the human body systems:

cardiovascular, lymphatic and excretory.

ASTRONOMY:  Teams will demonstrate an understanding of stellar evolution in normal and starburst galaxies.

BOOMILEVER: Teams will design and build a Boomilever meeting requirements specified in the rules supporting a

minimum load and to achieve the highest structural efficiency.

CHEMISTRY LAB: Teams will complete one or more tasks and answer a series of questions involving the science

processes of chemistry focused in the areas of Physical Properties and Acids and Bases.

CIRCUIT LAB: Participants must complete tasks and answer questions about electricity and magnetism.

CODEBUSTERS: Teams will cryptanalyze (decode) encrypted messages using cryptanalysis techniques and show skill

with advanced ciphers by encrypting or decrypting a message.

DESIGNER GENES: Participants will solve problems and analyze data or diagrams using their knowledge of the basic

principles of genetics, molecular genetics and biotechnology.

DISEASE DETECTIVES: Students will use investigative skills in the scientific study of disease, injury, health and

disability in populations or groups of people.

DYNAMIC PLANET: Students will use process skills to complete tasks related to glaciers, glaciation and long-term

climate change.

EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: This event will determine a participant's ability to design, conduct and report the findings

of an experiment conducted entirely on site.

FERMI QUESTIONS: Teams provide answers to a series of Fermi Questions, which are science-related questions

that seek fast, rough estimates of a quantity which is either difficult or impossible to measure directly.

FORENSICS: Given a scenario and some possible suspects, participants will perform a series of tests which along

with other evidence or test results will be used to solve a crime.

FOSSILS: Teams demonstrate their knowledge of ancient life by completing selected tasks at a series of stations

including but not limited to fossil identification, answering questions about classification, habitat, ecologic

relationships, behaviors, environmental adaptations and the use of fossils to date and correlate rock units.

GEOLOGIC MAPPING: Teams will demonstrate understanding in the construction and use of topographic maps,

geologic maps, and cross sections, and their use in forming interpretations regarding subsurface structures

and geohazard risks.

HERPETOLOGY: Participants will be assessed on their knowledge of amphibians and reptiles.

MISSION POSSIBLE: Participants design, build, test and document a Rube Goldberg-like device that completes a

required action through an optional series of specific actions.

MOUSETRAP VEHICLE: Teams design, build and test a vehicle using one or two snap mousetraps as its sole means

of propulsion to push a paper cup forward, reverse direction, and stop as close as possible to a target point.

PROTEIN MODELING: Students will use computer visualization and online resources to construct physical models of

the CRISPR Cas9 protein that is being engineered to edit plant and animal cell genomes, and answer a

series of questions about the chemistry of protein folding and the interaction of structure and function for model proteins.

SOUNDS OF MUSIC: Teams must construct and tune one device prior to the tournament based on a 12-tone equal

tempered scale and complete a written test on the physics of sound.

THERMODYNAMICS: Teams must construct an insulated device prior to the tournament that is designed to retain

heat and complete a written test on thermodynamic concepts.

WATER QUALITY: Participants will be assessed on their understanding and evaluation of aquatic environments.

WRIGHT STUFF: Prior to the competition teams design, construct and test free flight rubber-powered monoplanes

to achieve maximum time aloft.

WRITE IT DO IT: One student will write a description of an object and how to build it, and then the other student

will attempt to construct the object from the description.